Metro Vancouver’s Waste-to-Energy Facility: no detectable effects on local or regional air quality.

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The 2013 environmental monitoring and reporting data for Metro Vancouver’s Waste-to-Energy Facility located in Burnaby shows the plant had no detectable effects on local or regional air quality. All emissions were below regulatory limits, with most far below, and some not even detectable.

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Less Food Waste Means Less Garbage From Single-Family Homes

Taking food waste out of the garbage has made a huge difference in the amount of Metro Vancouver garbage going to landfill.

By putting food waste and leftovers  into their green carts instead of garbage bins Metro Vancouver residents of single-family homes have reduced their garbage by almost 30 per cent in the last three years. Continue reading

Scientific Review finds No Health Risks to Waste-to-Energy Projects.

Literature Review of Potential Health Risk Issues Associated with New Waste-to-Energy Facilities

A comprehensive examination of peer-reviewed scientific studies and government and industry reports show there are no unacceptable health risks to residents living in the vicinity of a modern waste-to-energy facility equipped with the best-available pollution control technologies.

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Mattress Recycling

Each year in our region a lot of mattresses are thrown out. In fact if you stacked them all up you would get a pile the size of Mount Everest.
But in Metro Vancouver there are certain materials that our disposal facilities do not accept, and mattresses are one of them. Almost every part of a mattress can be recycled and there are local companies happy to do the job.
Thanks to metrovancouverecycles.ca it’s easy to find out where you can recycle your mattress.

Bylaw 280 Supports Local Recycling

Metro Vancouver has a thriving recycling sector but these businesses are under threat due to the practice of trucking waste out of our region to avoid disposal bans.

Ed Walsh, V.P of operations for Emterra Environmental is concerned, “The economics of a potentially lower tipping fee somewhere else that included both waste and recycling, would adversely affect us.”
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